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Finding Acceptance

The second in a series of video excerpts from our Celebrating Science workshop held on July 21, 2017, on San Juan Island. Dr. Astrid van Ginneken - Finding Acceptance If you aren’t already a CWR Member, you may want to consider becoming one. Membership benefits include a quarterly newsletter, the WHALE report; free downloads of CWR’s Southern Resident and Bigg’s Transient Photo-ID Guides; and email notifications of CWR field staff orca encounters. Becoming a CWR Member helps us continue our studies and speak out on behalf of the Southern Resident orcas. Learn more > #killerwhales #orcas #marinemammals #endangeredspecies #southernresidents #OrcaSurvey

How do Orcas cope with loss?

The first in a series of video excerpts from our Celebrating Science workshop held on July 21, 2017, on San Juan Island. Dr. Astrid van Ginneken - How do Orcas cope with loss? #whales #endangeredwhales #southernresidents #KenBalcomb #orcas #killerwhales

Big Year for Bigg’s Killer Whales

T36 and T137A - Photo by Dave Ellifrit/CWR The Center for Whale Research (whaleresearch.com) has been monitoring Southern Resident and Bigg’s/Transient killer whale presence in the central Salish Sea and Puget Sound for more than 40 years. 2017 was a year of contrast in killer whale sightings. The Southern Resident killer whales were notably absent from what has historically been their “core summer habitat” from April through September with the lowest number of days sighted in the history of the Center for Whale Research’s Orca Survey. A similar trend was observed in 2013, when even J pod whales were absent for days and weeks at a time. These two years (2013 and 2017) have one thing in commo

My Visit to the Snake

The story below was written by the Center for Whale Research’s founder and senior scientist Ken Balcomb, who has been studying the Southern Resident killer whales of the Pacific Northwest for more than forty years. My Visit to the Snake was authored in 2015, but is as relevant today as it was then. The number of whales in Southern Resident community continues to decline, as do the Chinook fish counts. Since this story was written the number of whales in the community has declined from 80 to 76. Without immediate action by Washington State and federal politicians, the magnificent creatures known as the Southern Resident killer whales (orcas) are doomed to extinction. Please read Ken’s story,

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