2022 Encounters

Encounter #70- Oct 1, 2022
T101B surfacing with T100B1

T101B surfacing with T100B1

Copyright © 2022 Center for Whale Research

T101B surfacing with T65A5

T101B surfacing with T65A5

Copyright © 2022 Center for Whale Research

T101B surfacing ahead of T100B1

T101B surfacing ahead of T100B1

Copyright © 2022 Center for Whale Research

T101B

T101B

Copyright © 2022 Center for Whale Research

T101A in front of Lime Kiln lighthouse

T101A in front of Lime Kiln lighthouse

Copyright © 2022 Center for Whale Research

T101A

T101A

Copyright © 2022 Center for Whale Research

T65A5 beside T101A

T65A5 beside T101A

Copyright © 2022 Center for Whale Research

T65A5 surfacing with T101A

T65A5 surfacing with T101A

Copyright © 2022 Center for Whale Research

T101

T101

Copyright © 2022 Center for Whale Research

T101 with T100B

T101 with T100B

Copyright © 2022 Center for Whale Research

20210930KMJ_SJ1_3.jpg

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EncDate:01/10/22 

EncSeq:3

Enc#*:70

ObservBegin:05:28 PM

ObservEnd:06:29 PM

Vessel:Orcinus

Staff:Michael Weiss

Other Observers:Darren Croft, Mia Nielsen, Federica Spina

Pods:Transients

IDsEncountered:T101, T101A, T101B, T100B, T100B1, T65A5

LocationDescr:Haro Strait

Start Latitude:48 29.86

Start Longitude:123 08.37

End Latitude:48 34.14

End Longitude:123 10.76

 

EncSummary:

After leaving the T100s down by Cattle Point (see Aerial Observation Encounter 16), the team was heading back home via the west side of San Juan Island. On their way, the crew spotted another group of killer whales that had not been previously reported that day, making their way up the west side. The team had used all their drone batteries on the T100s, so set out to get proof of presence and ID photos on the whales in the group.

The whales were split into two groups, with two males and two juveniles in the back, and two adult females leading the way. The team quickly IDed the two adult males as T101A and T101B, and later IDed one of the juveniles as T100B1. Strangely enough, it turned out that the last juvenile was T65A5, who seems to be a free agent these days in terms of social affiliation.

The adult males and youngsters were extremely frisky and playful, with lots of rolling and splashing at the surface and some visible "sea snakes." These four eventually split, with T101B and T100B1 staying further offshore while T101A and T65A5 cut very close inshore. T101 and T100B led the group some ways in front of the others.

As the whales passed the entrance to Snug Harbor, they cut offshore and slowly headed to the west of Kellet Bluffs. The team left the whales at 18:29 as they continued to head north.

Photos taken under Federal Permits

NMFS PERMIT: 21238/ DFO SARA 388